The thoughts of Chris Gurton on motorsport, his photography, his work and his life in general. The thoughts, views and opinion's expressed in this blog are those of Chris Gurton and not necessarily those of any publication that he contributes to.

Posts tagged “Motorsport

Baying for a Crash.

It’s now become quite obvious that if you are an organiser of a mainstream motorsport championship or event and you want some coverage in the national media, then all you need to do is get someone to have a big crash. If the driver involved in that crash is a popular ex Formula One driver, then all the better. You’re guaranteed a few column inches somewhere in the back pages and even an article on the BBC’s ‘Formula One is the only form of Motorsport’ website.

Sadly, this seems to be the only way the FIA World Endurance Championship can get any coverage in the British Media. Mark Webber’s huge accident in Sao Paulo on Sunday make it on to the BBC website, thanks to the loose Formula One connection, and also into a few national newspapers. I even heard it mentioned in the sport on Absolute Radio’s breakfast show. Those of you who saw it will have winced and be extremely relieved that Mark is OK. It’s a testament to safety in sports car racing that people can walk away from such impacts.

There must be better ways for Porsche to get some publicity of their World Endurance team?

There must be better ways for Porsche to get some publicity of their World Endurance team?

But what really annoys me is that despite the media coverage, I have not seen a single report from these national news outlets that has mentioned the winner of the race. Porsche’s name is all over reports as the car Webber was driving, but no one mentioned that the second Porsche car in the race took victory. Not only that but after a titanic battle with the number 8 Toyota which saw the two cars split by just 0.170 of a second after six hours of racing.

On the subject of the number 8 Toyota, where were these journalists desperate to grab attention with pictures and news of a devastating crash that could have claimed the life of a racing driver, when just two weeks ago, the drivers of said Toyota, the Swiss Sebastien Buemi and British racer Anthony Davidson claimed the World Championship? A British driver winning a World Championship and no one was interested in reporting it.

Image: Chris Gurton Photography

Anthony Davidson: A British sporting World Champion the media aren’t interested in.

Sadly it’s the same for that great motoring institution, Rallying. You don’t get any media coverage of it unless a spectator is sadly injured or killed. As was the case with reports from the Jim Clarke rally, and this tiny piece on the BBC sport website about the Grizedale rally which thanks to really poor reporting suggests an incident far worse than that that actually took place.

I’ve been at touring car races where crowds cheer when someone crashes. I’ve spoken to people who have stated they only like motorsport when there are crashes. How would these people like it if they were involved in an accident on the M25 and witnesses stopped, got out of their cars and started cheering? Is this really the mentality of people these days? Is it what people want? Is that why the media love a good crash story because it gets more attention? I really hope not. We all know the situation with Jules Bianchi so must realise that accidents and crashes are a serious matter.
Surely as motorsport fans we all want to see close and exciting racing. Crashes don’t really add to the excitement. Having been at LeMans when there have been two particularly nasty accidents, the silence of a quarter of a million spectators is chilling. The only cheering was when news that in both cases, the drivers were ok. Sadly that isn’t always the outcome.
We all know motorsport is dangerous. Competition is close and drivers push themselves to the limit and sometimes beyond, so accidents will inevitably happen and thankfully, those baying for crashes are in the small minority of fans. But the mentality of these people needs to change and the media needs to do its bit in helping that and not encouraging it. So please stop with the ‘Crashes make good stories’ attitude. Oh, and BBC, Formula One isn’t the be all and end all of motorsport, there is so much more out there. You can’t even get the rights to show a full season of F1 live so how about investing a bit of money in showing other live motorsport?

 

Rubens: Always happy!

Rubens: Always happy!

I guess the only positive to come from the Mark Webber accident is Rubens Barrichello’s instagram photo. I’m pretty sure if Rubens was to visit you in hospital he’d do a pretty good job of cheering you up. But is it just me, or does he look like an excited expectant father about to witness the birth of his and Mark Webber’s bizarre but superhuman love child?

Advertisements

WEC Silverstone Review: Toyota Wins Opening Race!

 

Image copyright: Chris Gurton Photography

Toyota claim the first victory of the 2014 WEC season.

 

6 Hours of Silverstone – the opening round of the FIA World Endurance Championship – was dramatically clinched by Toyota, who skilfully kept their cool despite the torrential rain.
Although the race was ended early due to torrential rain, Team Toyota, which consists of Sebastien Buemi, Anthony Davidson and Nicolas Lapierre, not only left Mark Webber’s Porsche and both of the stunning Audi R18 e-trons in their wake, but they also clinched the win from their sister team too, Alexander Wurz, Stephane Sarrazin and Kazuki Nakajima.

Considering the difficulty of the weather and track conditions, the legendary Mark Webber seemed content with a podium place on his debut WEC race, sharing the glory with Timo Bernhard and Brendon Hartley. In comparison, this year’s Silverstone was Audi’s worst performance in 3 years.

Image copyright: Chris Gurton Photography

Audi were to have a disastrous race.

Audi’s Gamble
Straight from the green, Audi’s Lucas Di Grassi set off at a record pace, immediately attacking Alex Wurz of Toyota in his TS 040 Hybrid. This excitement was short-lived for Di Grassi however, as he took the Club Corner too wide towards the end of the first lap, allowing Sebastien Buemi of Toyota to claim second place. Porsche were also disappointing towards the end of the first lap, with Neel Jani dropping from third to sixth position.

Image copyright: Chris Gurton Photography

Neither Audi R18’s were to finish the race.

Running into traffic on lap 14, Toyota’s Alexander Wurz lost first place to Andre Lotterer, and Audi has their first lead in the race. However Audi decided to gamble while other cars were being called into the pits for wet tyres, and soon after Di Grassi crashed heavily into the barriers, sliding off the track at Woodcote. The Audi driver managed to get the R 18 e-tron back to the pits for some quick cover , however with a damaged monocoque the car was too badly damaged to continue the race, with Di Grassi looking understandably devastated.
Webber’s Return
It wasn’t just Audi that experienced car damage at Silverstone either; Porsche’s Neel Jani suffered severe tyre failure and subsequently lost his left wheel, but after 15 minutes in the pit Porsche successfully retuned to the track. Audi’s day continued to go from bad to worse however, as Andre Lotterer lost 25 seconds to Sebastien Buemi after sliding off the track at Stowe. Finishing sixth overall after a lengthy stint in the pits, Lotterer and Audi certainly had 6 hours to forget at Silverstone.

Image copyright: Chris Gurton Photography

Mark Webber was to pick up a podium on his Debut WEC race on Porsche’s return to the top category in endurance racing.

Timo Brenhard was replaced by team mate Brendon Hartley after Porsche’s 52nd lap pit, with the New Zealander showing his talent behind the wheel by hauling the R 18 e-tron back to fourth. With three hours to go, WEC Silverstone then settled into the traditional endurance test, and it really was anyone’s race. However Audi’s bad luck wasn’t quite over, with Treluyer hitting the barriers at Copse and bending both front wheels.
After 21 minutes of the safety car, Porsche’s Hartley pitted and gave up the seat to the fan favourite Mark Webber, allowing the Australian his first taste of WEC racing in 15 years. As the final two hours of Silverstone positioning remained the same, the rain made conditions unsafe to say the least, with the safety car came out once again, followed by red flags stopping the race.

Image copyright: Chris Gurton Photography

The number 7 Toyota was to claim second place behind its team mates.


Are 2014 Formula 1 Cars the Ugliest we have seen?

With the second Bahrain test now completed, F1 fans have now seen enough of the new 2014 challengers to still hold a strong opinion that they are the ugliest car the grid has ever seen.

Torro Rosso's 'Anteater' Nose

Torro Rosso’s ‘Anteater’ Nose

Many of us believe that Formula 1 cars need to be a thing of beauty which stand out from the crowd and resembles a work of art. Williams were the first to shock the F1 community with their FW36 challenger which featured a peculiar anteater nose. McLaren followed suit with a weird looking tripod-effect nose and Lotus with its twin tusks diffidently caught the eye within the paddock, but the worst in my opinion was the Torro Rosso and the Caterham, it just looked wrong and it definitely didn’t look like an anteater. Even the great designer Adrian Newey who ensured his cars where aesthetically pleasing conceded that ‘this year’s Red Bull is unfortunately ugly’.

Caterham's take on the new nose

Caterham’s take on the new nose

So why have the new cars become so unbelievably ugly? Well, it’s all down to the new aerodynamic regulations for the 2014 season with the aim to increase safety. The regulation stipulates that the nose tip has to be 365mm lower than its predecessors.  The rule was introduced to prevent ‘T-bone’ crashes as well as cars launching over the top of others. The regulations instructs designers that ONLY the nose has to be a certain height and not the suspension or the front end of the monocoque, thus resulting in the radical designs of the nose we are seeing.

The new nose designs are to make the cars safer if involved in a collision

The new nose designs are to make the cars safer if involved in a collision

A lower nose will greatly reduce/block the aerodynamic flow under the car, therefore in order to maximise the airflow designers have retained the maximum permitted front monocoque then adding the minimum and amount of carbon fibre to comply with the nose height regulation whilst being strong enough to pass the crash test.

However, not all the cars have the weird anteater, finger whatever you want to call it nose. Both Mercedes and Ferrari have gone conservative with their design, by sloping the whole front section into a flat nose to create more down force enabling the car to have more front end grip through corners.

Ferrari have managed to make a half decent job of the new nose regs.

Ferrari have managed to make a half decent job of the new nose regs.

The odd one out from this is Lotus with its twin tusk design which attempt to presents slightly more total cross sectional area to the airflow, which I believe is a very clever design. The design as you will see has one of the two tusks slightly longer than the other; this is to comply with the minimum height regulation, a brilliant example of F1 designers pushing the design to the limit.

The 'Twin Tusk' offering from Lotus

The ‘Twin Tusk’ offering from Lotus

The 2012 Ferrari nose caused initial horror.

The 2012 Ferrari nose caused initial horror.

The thing with Formula 1 cars is that we all grow into the design and by the mid-season we end up loving them. In 2009 when the cars changed to taller slimmer rear wings and wider front wings we all hated, we all said (including myself) it didn’t look like F1 cars anymore and I personally ended up loving the new look. In 2012, the stepped noses where slaughtered by the F1 community especially with Ferrari’s Lego nose, but I ended up loving it and to this day I think it’s one of the most beautiful F1 cars I have ever seen. That’s why this year although initial reaction is negative, fans will accept the design and love it.

Guest Post by Hiten Solanki


Car Loan 4U Team Takes 2013 British Drift Championships

The sport of drift racing has been gaining more and more attention over the last few years, helped no doubt by the hugely popular Fast and Furious franchise.

Drifting is the sport of drift racing involves purposefully losing traction in the rear wheels, causing the car to go into a long skid, which the drivers control by literally steering into. A car is said to be drifting when the rear slip angle is greater than the front slip angle.

Image: Car Loan 4 U

The British Drift Championships is now in its sixth year and is now considered to be the highest level of competition held anywhere in Europe. With some of the world’s leading car manufacturers putting vehicles into the competition and with support from the likes of Cosworth, Samco and Lucas Oils, as well as main event sponsor Maxxis Tyres, the BDC has become an essential fixture on the British Motor sporting calendar.

And watching these guys racing these cars at death defying speeds, smoke billowing out from their rear tyres, it’s not hard to see where the appeal comes from. This is motor racing as edge-of-your-seat adrenaline sport, with drivers regularly maintaining what seems to be nothing more than a few inches between the car in front of them as they take bends without even seeming to slow down.

Image: Car Loan 4 U

The 22nd and 23rd of September saw the final round of the British Drift Championship take place in Knockhill Circuit in Dunfermline, with the Car Loan 4U team taking the team / constructors title in its first drifting season.

It’s not turning out to be a bad season for team Car Loan 4U driver, Matt Samuel either, who came first overall in the Semi Professional category, taking the title with a comfortable 30 point margin. Matt, who also won the Japfest DriftKings championship earlier in the year, will now move up to the Pro Class for 2014. The battle for second and third place in the semi pro was tighter though, with Matt Hitchcock taking second place with 60 points, with Luke Woodham taking third with 59 points.

In the pro class, Jay Green took the title with an 81 points, a seven point lead from second place Jay White on 74 points and third place Paul Cheshire on 72 points.

Image: Car Loan 4 U

The super pro class was a battle until the end with individual victories across the first four rounds going to different drivers. With no clear leader it was all to play for at the Knockhill circuit and in the end the silverware ended up in the hands of Team MnM’s Mike Marshall, who had remained consistent throughout the championship.

For a full breakdown of the leader boards visit the BDC website.

Author Bio:

Joe Cox writes for Car Loan 4U and is a regular blogger on cars, car finance, as well as all things fast and furious on four wheels.


2014 British GT Wall Calendar

Last Sunday saw the conclusion of a fantastic British GT championship which, again went down to the wire in a trilling battle at Donington Park. With six teams in contention for the Championship title and a further 4 more in the GT4 class, the action didn’t disappoint with the top 3 at the end of the season separated by just three and a half points.

You can read all about the thrilling finale on the Checkered Flag website, here. But as the curtain draws on a fantastic season full of highs and lows, close battles and stunning performances thoughts are starting to turn towards next year’s season with great anticipation.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

The British GT Finale at Donington went down to the wire.

However, it is with great pleasure that I can announce that this year I am once again producing another limited edition A3 sized wall calendar. But this year’s edition will feature images from this season’s British GT championship. All the top teams such as Beechdean Aston Martin, AF Corse, United Autosports, Ecurie Ecosse & Motorbase are represented in this high quality calendar as well as drivers such as Nick Tandy, Ollie Bryant, Jonny Adam, Duncan Tappy, Aaron Scott, Joe Osborne and the late great Allan Simonsen. Every round of the championship is featured and the calendar is printed in such a way that you can cut out and keep the images for future use.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

January features the Ecurie Ecosse BMW Z4 of Marco Attard & Ollie Bryant

Orders of the 2014 British GT calendar are now being taken and not only is this year’s calendar cheaper than last years, the price again includes free postage and packaging and Orders made in the next few weeks will also receive a free A4 sized British GT Print.

So what are you waiting for? This would make the ideal Christmas gift or Birthday present for motorsport fans and petrol heads alike who, during the whole of next year can reflect on what a superb season the 2013 British GT Championship was.

You can order your copy of the 2014 British GT Wall Calendar here and whilst on the Chris Gurton Photography Website, why not also check out my motorsport galleries from this season where prints can also be purchased that would also make an ideal gift.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

Order your copy today.


Trophy of the Dunes

This weekend saw the British GT championship head to Europe for rounds Eight and Nine at Zandvoort in Holland for the ‘Trophy of the Dunes’. So, naturally, I was there too and a great weekend was had.

Having got the overnight ferry from Harwich to the Hook of Holland, myself and my travel companions, Photographer Tom and Adam along with Journalist James, arrived at the circuit after a 50 mile drive on Friday morning. None of us had visited Zandvoort before but the formalities of signing in, getting our passes and photo bibs was no problem and we had found our way to the media centre without any issue. There was a lot of racing on the timetable but we were only there to cover the British GT, however we decided to use an early Dutch Supercar Challenge session to give us a feel of what the circuit was like.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

British GT Headed to Zandvoort in Holland for the ‘Trophy of the Dunes’

Thankfully any red zones, the area’s that photographers are not allowed in for safety reasons, were clearly marked and the circuit was fairly easy to navigate round. The trouble with visiting a new circuit is that you can never be too sure where the good angles are and a lot of time is spent hunting them out and trying different spots to see what works and what doesn’t. This was definitely the case this weekend and the two 55 minute practice sessions were spent in various sections of the track trying to cover as many area’s as possible.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

Sparks fly as the United Autosport Audi heads up the hill.

The Circuit is right beside the sea with the beach just a few hundred meters behind the main grandstand and the track weaving between sand dunes. Static caravans and a bizarre Centre-Parcs which seemed to be a tower block of apartments provided some of the backdrop that the dunes didn’t. The undulations helped provide some good angles and perspectives on the 2.676 mile circuit and the sand below our feet was certainly a change from the norm at a race track. The weather was humid and dry for the first session but the locals had said it can be changeable. This was proved right as the skies darkened and the rain fell before the second practice session at the end of the day. As the cars took to the track the rain did ease but standing water in some area’s did prove some challenge for the drivers.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

The rain caused some standing water.

As the day drew to an end, it was time to head to the apartment we had booked. It was only a mile or so from the track and in the town. This was handy as although we spent a long time walking around trying to find a supermarket, we didn’t have too far to go. It was good to see there were a couple of British TV channel’s on the TV including the BBC.  The evening was spent drinking beer and eating burger and chips while looking through the days photos and deciding where to go for the other sessions during the weekend.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

I’ve never experience static caravans as a backdrop at a circuit.

Saturday arrived and the Qualifying session was first up. I headed to the far side of the circuit to shoot this and the view from the top of the hill was pretty good. The weather, albeit humid, was cloudy and during the qualifying session there was a light shower which made for some interesting qualifying times for the races. It was going to make for some interesting racing.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

The weather was changeable during qualifying.

Race one was to take place at the end of the day so there was quite a wait till then but the time was filled with photo editing and watching some of the other racing taking place throughout the day. I had decided to head out to the far side of the track again but work my way back the opposite way to which I did earlier during qualifying. The racing was good but I couldn’t help feel like I struggled somewhat with my camera. I just wasn’t feeling happy with some of the angles I was getting so spent a lot of time moving around. This also led to myself almost bumping into a startled deer amongst an area of long grass and bushes. Luckily it didn’t run onto the track. The race seemed over a lot quicker than the one hour and I was left a little disappointed with the photos I had taken.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

I felt I struggled behind the lens over the weekend.

Sunday was a new day however and after an evening of watching the delightful Rachel Riley on Strictly Come Dancing I was hoping I could make amends and get some good images. The overnight and morning rain had stopped just in time for the 10 minute warm up session which I spent in the pit lane.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

I spent the warm up session in the wet pit lane.

There were a couple of sections of the circuit I still hadn’t explored which I had planned to visit during the second race. The rain had gone and the sun was out ready for the second GT race and I had decided to capture the start on the outside of the first corner. I was a long walk to get there but thankfully a guy in a golf cart took me most of the way. I knew I would have to walk a long way back to get to the rest of the race from the area’s I the wanted to be, but I was hoping the start shot that would take in the whole of the long pit straight would be worth it.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

It was a long walk to get the start shot on the outside of the first corner.

I had spent the first few minutes of the race at the first corner before the long brisk walk back to the area’s I wanted to get to. I had sacrificed about 15 minutes of shooting to get the start shot so needed to make the remaining time count. Again, there was good close racing on show and I was feeling happier behind the camera and quite pleased with some of the results. I had just got to the last place I wanted to be before the end of the race and was feeling more content. The circuit was great and I think if I was to visit again I would hopefully get a bit more out of myself knowing now where some of the good angles are.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

I managed to get a few good angles during the second race.

We left the circuit late afternoon to head back to the port to get the overnight ferry home. It was the end of a good weekend that I had enjoyed and spent in good company. Holland is a really nice country and everyone was very friendly, plus they do good chips too so I hope to visit again soon. Maybe the British GT championship will be back next year.

To read full race reports from the weekend, visit the Checkered Flag website here.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

I’d be more than happy to visit Zandvoort again in the future.


After the Summer Break

After a summer break away from the circuits of the UK, giving me some time to indulge in another passion of mine, it was soon back to being trackside and behind the camera to shoot two great motorsport events in the space of three weekends.

First up was the Silverstone Classic. An event I have covered for a few years now and one I really enjoy. There is always so much to see and do, even before you consider the 24 races taking place on track. The highlights for me are always the Classic GT cars and the Group C Endurance cars. But the races include all genre’s including F1 cars from the 60’s to the 80’s, Formula Juniors, F2 and Touring cars, with much more in between to satisfy all tastes in class motorsport.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

The Silverstone Classic shows amazing cars doing what they were designed to do.

It always pleases me to see multi-million pound race cars doing what they were designed to do, race. Rather than seeing them sat in a museum and not being used. The racing is still close and exciting, despite the huge costs involved in running such beautiful pieces of motorsport history and the crowd really appreciate the spectacle. Sadly, the adverse weather conditions on the Saturday evening meant the Group C ‘Dusk’ race was cancelled, much to my disappointment, but the rain was torrential and racing such powerful and expensive cars in the conditions would have been a risk too far. Thankfully, there was an extended Group C race on the Sunday to make up for it.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

The Group C race is always a highlight

A highlight of the Silverstone Classic weekend, along with the track action is the car clubs who arrive in their droves and display their cars for all to see, from classic Aston Martins, to modern Lamborghini’s and so much more, including some incredibly rare makes and models of car all looking in immaculate condition.  A track parade took place on the Sunday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Porsche 911. The aim was to have nine hundred and eleven Porsche 911’s on track, but the actual figure was over 1200!

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

So many classic race cars from all era’s were out racing

It was a great weekend and I, along with the many thousands of fans and spectators will be looking forward to next year’s event.

Two weeks after the Silverstone Classic was another exciting weekend for me and another I really look forward too. After their summer break, it was the British GT championship race at Brands Hatch. My favourite British race series at my favourite British Circuit. It was also great to have two good friends and fellow photographers stay over for the weekend to make it even more enjoyable.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

My favourite British race series on my favourite British Track

The gorgeous GT machines were bathed in sun all weekend and the action on track was just as hot as the weather. Another large grid of competitive cars and drivers was enough to whet the appetite of any motorsport fan. We also saw the new liveried Audi R8 of Warren Hughes and Rembert Bert which is now run by WRT and I must say, I liked it a lot. It was also nice to see each car sporting a number with a tribute to Allan Simonsen.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

The WRT Audi sporting a new livery and a tribute to Allan Simonsen

I really enjoy photographing the Grand Prix Circuit at Brands Hatch. It provides you with a number of great angles, backdrops and elevations. The two hour GT race also meant I could walk much of the track to get many different angles and viewpoints to photograph from.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

Zak Brown escaped unhurt after this huge accident caused by a tyre blow out

An action packed two hour race seemed to fly by and a win for Andrew Howard and Jonny Adam in their Beechdean Aston Martin saw them climb to the top of the championship standings, but it is still close and with the next two races in Zandvoort next month before the season finale at Donington Park, it is still all to play for. As it is with the GT4 category where there is much battling for places in this hotly contested championship. You can read the race report from the British GT at Brand Hatch on The Checkered Flag website here.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

Andrew Howard and Jonny Adam now top the British GT Standings

The next race for me will be the British GT again at Zandvoort in a couple of week’s time. It’s a new circuit for me so I’m really looking forward to visiting it. In the mean time, I will be with my camera trackside, but a track of a very different nature. All will be revealed soon.

Image Copyright Chris Gurton Photography

Is there any better sight than a GT car pushing to the limit?